Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

Swiss archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a female singer dating back almost 3,000 years in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said on Sunday.

The rare find was made accidentally by a team from Switzerland’s Basel University headed by Elena Pauline-Grothe and Susanne Bickel in Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, the minister told the media in Cairo.

The woman, Nehmes Bastet, was a singer for the supreme deity Amon Ra during the Twenty-Second Dynasty (945-712 BC), according to an inscription on a wooden plaque found in the tomb.

She was the daughter of the High Priest of Amon, Ibrahim said.

The discovery is important because “it shows that the Valley of the Kings was also used for the burial of ordinary individuals and priests of the Twenty-Second Dynasty,” he added.

Until now the only tombs found in the historic valley were those linked to ancient Egyptian royal families.

  • Share/Bookmark

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Radio Archives

Fundraising with GoGetFunding
Fundraising with GoGetFunding

Give Your Support

The Global Reality represents a tireless effort to search, gather, and present information that even some alternative media channels refuse to discuss, let alone the mainstream. This effort is provided with no advertisements, no selling of products or services that are irrelevant and useless. There is only one sponsor: YOU!

Support the information that's in your right to know, that "they" dare not want you to know.

Notice: We can now take manual credit card entries for DVD's or donations. Those who do not want to use Paypal can now send your credit card number, expiration date, 3 digit security code and zip code to globalrealityshow@gmail.com along with the amount of purchase and we can process your order into our Paypal account without you having to use Paypal at all.

One-Time Donation

Donation Subscription

Monthly Recurring Donations
Your Own Amount: $

Join Us on FedBook